Comments on: On Selecting Typefaces for Different Passage Lengths http://designm.ag/resources/on-selecting-typefaces-for-different-passage-lengths/ Articles and Resources for Web Designers Tue, 20 Sep 2011 17:54:12 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.3 By: Joeyhttp://designm.ag/resources/on-selecting-typefaces-for-different-passage-lengths/#comment-42241 Mon, 13 Jun 2011 12:36:42 +0000 http://designm.ag/?p=27265#comment-42241 Thanks so much for sharing. Your article is simple, straightforward and very clear. I always struggle with font selection and can spend hours testing out different one’s this should help speed up the process.

However forgive my naivety but I don’t understand what “serif” and “sans serif” means. I could google it now but keen to get your feedback.

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By: lvhttp://designm.ag/resources/on-selecting-typefaces-for-different-passage-lengths/#comment-30801 Sun, 15 Aug 2010 10:01:09 +0000 http://designm.ag/?p=27265#comment-30801 Wonderful work of art… Thanks for the inspiration…

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By: D Bnonn Tennanthttp://designm.ag/resources/on-selecting-typefaces-for-different-passage-lengths/#comment-26863 Wed, 09 Jun 2010 22:11:20 +0000 http://designm.ag/?p=27265#comment-26863 Hey Matt, thanks for that article from Alex Poole; I hadn’t seen it before. I actually had Weildon’s findings in mind when I wrote my previous comment, so it’s interesting to see that Poole notes his methodology is suspect. You learn something new every day, huh.

That said, with my previous argument debunked, I’m still (like you) inclined to use a serif font for body copy. It seems to me that comfort plays a large role in legibility…so if comfort is a main reason that serif fonts are still used, that means that serif fonts are still more legible―even if it’s purely psychological. Right?

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By: Matt Wardhttp://designm.ag/resources/on-selecting-typefaces-for-different-passage-lengths/#comment-26839 Wed, 09 Jun 2010 12:40:53 +0000 http://designm.ag/?p=27265#comment-26839 Thanks Bnonn. I’m not sure that I completely agree, though. I’ve also read other articles that cite other studies where the difference between serif and sans-serif was negligible. I also have several magazines with long articles set in sans serif that I’ve never had any trouble reading.

Of course, personally I would probably set any long copy in a serif font for printed matter, but I think that a lot of the preference for the serif, both on the part of the designer and the reader has a lot to do with tradition and comfort than with biology and physics. As such, even if serif font does have a slight advantages, I’m not sure that it’s really fair to suggest their sans serif cousins are “extremely poorly suited” for use in body copy. Just my view though.

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